Florida Oceanographic Center

Florida Oceanographic Center Stingray PlayA visit to the Florida Oceanographic Center affords you unlimited access to a stingray tank and much more, though the stingrays remain the favorite. The Center offers daily feeding times where you can grab a shrimp by the tail and a stingray will come along a suck it out of your hand. Awesome, but not if you’re allergic to shrimp. If you are, like me, then please maintain a shrimp-free experience. If you are a preschooler, you might also be just as interested in the sensation of water as you are the stingrays, which is just a win-win as far as I’m concerned.

Also there to explore are touch tanks with star fish, anemones, snails and such. The “one finger only” rule applies here. Note: If your preschooler likes to carry a toy with them, try not to have the toy visit the touch tank. It happens.

Hands on exhibits can be found outside under a shaded area and inside as well. The grounds are accessible to strollers and wheelchairs alike. You can bring coolers for lunch at a picnic table. If not bringing lunch, definitely bring drinks to stay hydrated. If you forget, there are vending machines for drinks but no snacks for sale.

The second most watched exhibit was the Lagoon Fish Feeding Program. There is a large man-made pond that houses a variety of local fish. At feeding time, they come out to play. There are more fish on display inside in small tanks and aquariums. Keep an eye out for the moray eel.

We like to walk the trails on our trips and many trails in Florida lead to a view of the water, in this case, the beautiful Indian River Lagoon.

The Center offers many educational opportunities throughout the year and hosts a popular summer camp as well. There are numerous opportunities to extend the learning experience, or just take a simple day trip like we did. Either way, a visit to the Florida Oceanographic Center is a day well spent.

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Visit Florida Oceanographic Coastal Center for more information. Print out their Animals on Display page and create your own scavenger hunt form!

Visiting The Florida Oceanographic Center

Florida Oceanographic Center Stingray PlayA visit to the Florida Oceanographic Center affords you unlimited access to a stingray tank and much more, though the stingrays remain the favorite. The Center offers daily feeding times where you can grab a shrimp by the tail and a stingray will come along a suck it out of your hand. Awesome, but not if you’re allergic to shrimp. If you are, like me, then please maintain a shrimp-free experience. If you are a preschooler, you might also be just as interested in the sensation of water as you are the stingrays, which is just a win-win as far as I’m concerned.

Also there to explore are touch tanks with star fish, anemones, snails and such. The “one finger only” rule applies here. Note: If your preschooler likes to carry a toy with them, try not to have the toy visit the touch tank. It happens.

Hands on exhibits can be found outside under a shaded area and inside as well. The grounds are accessible to strollers and wheelchairs alike. You can bring coolers for lunch at a picnic table. If not bringing lunch, definitely bring drinks to stay hydrated. If you forget, there are vending machines for drinks but no snacks for sale.

The second most watched exhibit was the Lagoon Fish Feeding Program. There is a large man-made pond that houses a variety of local fish. At feeding time, they come out to play. There are more fish on display inside in small tanks and aquariums. Keep an eye out for the moray eel.

We like to walk the trails on our trips and many trails in Florida lead to a view of the water, in this case, the beautiful Indian River Lagoon.

The Center offers many educational opportunities throughout the year and hosts a popular summer camp as well. There are numerous opportunities to extend the learning experience, or just take a simple day trip like we did. Either way, a visit to the Florida Oceanographic Center is a day well spent.

Visit Florida Oceanographic Coastal Center for more information. Print out their Animals on Display page and create your own scavenger hunt form!

The Largest Aquarium in the World

We finally made our way to the largest aquarium in the world. We had tried once before on a Thanksgiving weekend a few years back but it was sold out. I’m so glad we came back on an off day in April. We could wander free from crowds and get up close and linger awhile.

 

We always have to stick our hands in the touch tank. Here the water is surprisingly cold and the anemone tentacles behave more plant- like than animal-like.

20130401-104054.jpg

Stingrays are steady movers and they tend to make loops. Sometimes they rest on the bottom. To me they have personalities similar to cats. They are very aware and present in their environments, but remain aloof.
20130401-104701.jpg

Hello penguins! They paid no attention to people popping up and down in the plexiglass windows whatsoever. They are certainly their own species. Again, a cold climate encounter.

20130401-104535.jpg

We also enjoyed the unexpected frog exhibit.

20130401-104550.jpg

We hope to visit the The Georgia Aquarium again soon. (http://www.georgiaaquarium.org/).

20130401-103456.jpg

The Largest Aquarium in the World

We finally made our way to the largest aquarium in the world. We had tried once before on a Thanksgiving weekend a few years back but it was sold out. I’m so glad we came back on an off day in April. We could wander free from crowds and get up close and linger awhile.

We always have to stick our hands in the touch tank. Here the water is surprisingly cold and the anemone tentacles behave more plant- like than animal-like.

20130401-104054.jpg

Stingrays are steady movers and they tend to make loops. Sometimes they rest on the bottom. To me they have personalities similar to cats. They are very aware and present in their environments, but remain aloof.
20130401-104701.jpg

Hello penguins! They paid no attention to people popping up and down in the plexiglass windows whatsoever. They are certainly their own species. Again, a cold climate encounter.

20130401-104535.jpg

We also enjoyed the unexpected frog exhibit.

20130401-104550.jpg

We hope to visit the The Georgia Aquarium again soon. (http://www.georgiaaquarium.org/).

20130401-103456.jpg